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Podcast Season 1 Episode 6: Dr. Pratistha Strong/Kathmandu Clinic

On this episode of the show, I'm interviewing Dr. Pratistha Strong from the Kathmandu Clinic in Kirkwood, MO.

Dr. Strong was born in Kathmandu, Nepal. Her worldview encompasses the East and the West. She incorporates the philosophy that one’s mind, body, and ātman (Sanskrit: inner self or soul) need investigation when approaching one’s health.

She is honored to be a physician with a concierge medical practice in St. Louis, Missouri. Her medical education ensured that she continued to uphold her heritage and values. She is a dedicated osteopathic physician who is committed to her Eastern principles. She incorporates this into her daily life and encourages her patients to do the same.

Website: www.doctorpstrong.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KathmanduClinic/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kathmanduclinic/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pratistha-strong-do-2a6311124/
Phone: (918) 814-3996

Transcript

  1. spk_0

    1.     Hello and welcome to STL Active; St Louis' premier health and wellness podcast. STL Active aims to give listeners in the St Louis area the information they need to succeed and progress with their health and fitness. This podcast is brought to you by stlouispt.com and hosted by Doctor of physical therapy, Greg Judice”

     

    “Hey, guys, it's Dr Greg, owner and physical therapist at Judice Sports and Rehab. On this episode of the show, I'm interviewing Dr Pratistha Strong. Dr. Strong is the owner of the Kathmandu Clinic here in ST Louis. Dr. Strong is a concierge primary care physician focused on providing high quality personalized care. Originally from Nepal, she is a dedicated osteopathic physician while still maintaining Eastern principles and philosophies without further ado. Let's get into the interview with Dr Strong. Welcome to the show, Dr Strong. Thank you so much for being here.
    spk_1
    Thanks for having me.
    spk_0
    Absolutely. I'm glad we were able to finally connect. This is
    spk_1
    I know there's a lot of back and
    spk_0
    forth females. Okay, though we're here now. Yeah, exactly. This is great. So, um, let's start off with you telling listeners a little bit about your background.
    spk_1
    So my background like everything Everything? Sure, So I'm I was born in Nepal. I was born in Kathmandu, Kathmandu, Nepal and by clinic is called Happened a clinic for that reason and I came to the U S about when I was six and 1/2 Mostly Texan. So, um, near Houston Baytown If anyone knows where Baytown is Oh, my gosh. Ah, San Antonio Austin might I met my husband, San Antonio Austin, you know, mostly Texan and then medical school in Oklahoma. I went to Dio school in at Osun, Oklahoma. Tulsa. Um and I wanted to be a d o. I think, um because I had shattered a physician in South Texas that was a dio and I just was kind of, you know, she just took me in. I just walked into the clinic and I said, Hey, I really want to do this. And she was like, Come on in. And it was yeah, and she did feeling practice and she saw everybody young and old and everything, and it was like and she did manipulation. And she did actually cranial Ostia, Elsie apathy. And I was just kind of really intrigued by the whole process and everything. So, you know, I really wanted to be a dio in that because of seeing seeing her really, really seeing her
    spk_0
    a bit more hands on. Hands on. Typical exactly. Quote typical doctor. Exactly. Yeah,
    spk_1
    exactly. And she had a lot of other modality. Other therapies that were in the practice and that just really got people. You know, like, you know, there's one the dipping, the hand and wax stuff. And it was like, What? You know, I like all this because it's it helps people. They come in, they have a visit, and they are social, and they can talk, you know? It's like little ladies. It was so cute. So I went to school in Tulsa, and and I don't know if you wanted me to keep going, So I was, uh, set on becoming a forensic pathologist. Okay? Yeah, yeah, you know, So the whole C s I dead bodies, you're all that died in that generation. And then I got into a pathology program in Phoenix, Arizona, and, um, in my second month, I was grossing, and I found out I was allergic to formaldehyde, which isn't everything in all the tissue fixative and stuff restaurant issues. And I
    spk_0
    couldn't quite do that.
    spk_1
    Yeah, so then that kind of let me, um I have to kind of do some digging and say like, Oh, man, what do I do? Um, So then, um there I got into a family medicine residency ended up, You know, there's a huge earthquake in Nepal. So another offset of events that that I couldn't quite finish the program, and then from there, you know, I contacted my mentor, um, in South Texas, and she said, You know, you've had a lot of hiccups just come down to South Texas and teach because we need some faculty members for a physician assistant program. You just teach kind of figured things out. And, um so by that time, I had a, you know, a daughter already, and And, um so, you know, we're like, yeah, this is residencies for, you know, the whole residency then and then, like family issues from, um, the earthquake. And then, um, health. You know, to me, it's like, eat
    spk_0
    everything was going,
    spk_1
    Everything was going on. Yeah, And you don't first see these things you're just going through school and you're like, Oh, yeah, I'm going to do relevancy and then I'm gonna get my this and, you know,
    spk_0
    when you're in undergrad, this is it's a prescription. This is what you're supposed to do. Four years of this four years of this,
    spk_1
    but I was never typical. So I was never the typical one. So I I had a whole bunch of other on my CV is like super I've had. I've done so many things I've taught. I've taught seventh grade for two weeks, and I quit because I was like, I'm gonna be a doctor. I
    spk_0
    don't have that on myself.
    spk_1
    I don't have that CD that. Oops, No. But, um, I have I've had teaching experience. So that's why I got into the P A program and was, ah, clinical instructor there. So are they kind of. I was like, Hey, just throw me and whatever you need to, and they really did. They threw me in a whole bunch of different courses and didactic courses and even clinical courses and stuff, and I got my husband on board. So we team taught together, so that was really fun to We do that for a couple of years, and then I really wanted my license. And so, um, I my daughter, you know, by that time school age, we got into Montessori school when we try to pair like where the programs were with Montessori school and we matched this, you know, weird match. That happens that people, the general public doesn't know that. How precarious The's
    spk_0
    a lot of moving parts, moving parts out of people trying to get into a lot of different program. Exactly. My brother in law's a pulmonologist. Okay, so we've kind of experienced it along with him, right? Obviously not personally, but
    spk_1
    no. But, you know,
    spk_0
    with yeah, but it is a stressful process beyond Yeah. Yeah, it's because it's just
    spk_1
    the luck of the driver who was gonna call you, who's gonna interview? It's like, where you gonna go? And so you were in Jeff City, And then I got my own Missouri license and I was trying to get into residency that just finished the program out. But then I found out that CMS has a certain restrictions on how long, If you're you know, if you're a physician, if you're a resident, and if you don't finish a certain program than they cut your funding. So it was just like, you know what? I'm my license. We're here. So our daughter, our daughter's teacher at the time were like, Where do we move? Where we're, you know, we're talking to her, and she's like, You should go to Kirkwood. It's like, What? What? Who is that? Um, we thought it was like some little town. Some, you know, we had no idea. And it's like Alice's Nino suburb in ST Louis and check it out and stab you, like, really like this school. So that's the only reason that I'm in Kirkwood. Yeah. Yeah, Testimonial, right? Exactly. Yeah. And so then, you know, and I just during that that that year in Jeff City, I, you know, was really like, What do I do with my life? Like having an existential crisis like all these things happening And all these things kind of going wrong. And, um and I did this school search and I found, you know, about residencies and doctors and quitting and, you know, like all these kind of random Google searches I was doing and I found a Pamela libel. She's an MD. So she's based out of, um, Eugene, Oregon, and she's got her own practice. And she's got what's called an ideal medical clinic or ideal medical practice. Ideal medical care, Africa how she words it. But so I I saw her Web site and I was like, Oh, my God, what is this? It was like this light. Oh, you know, And I and I was like, You know what? I'm just It was like Midnight. Probably. And I was freaking out, and it was probably, you know, after a big long day of being on call or something, and, um, I e mailed her. And then the next day, she liked called me. She's like, I I'm Pamela out of their voices, like really happy. I'm Pamela. Like I thought, you know, you can do it. She's just always like you can do it. You don't need a board search case. You don't need the residency. You can do it. So who's it was so cool to have somebody say It's okay. All these things happen, but that's okay. You're still a good doctor. You can still do it. So I I kind of got into her She has a little program thing that you can read and listen in and kind of go through the steps of starting a practice. And that's an ideal medical practice. It's ideal because it's what I want to do. Right. Um and
    spk_0
    so the doctor is obviously gonna be exactly vied. Better care, better kid. Happy patient, right? So
    spk_1
    yeah, and so that's that's where. And that's that's basically how I ended up where I ended up, Um and yeah, yeah, I think that's a pretty long answer to your
    spk_0
    starts. Fine, fine. Perfect. So, you know, starting a business is a big decision. So how did you did you always know that you wanted to have your own practice? Or did that kind of fall into it with everything else that was going on?
    spk_1
    Well, you know, it's funny. When I was in med school in third year, I remember, you know, I remember telling people, you know, like, ah, whenever the residency boots, we would have bears and stuff and I was like, really into this Micro practices. You know what? I wanna have a micro practice. I won't have it. I would say that a lot and people will always look. Look at me like What are you talking about? Yeah, what do you say? It's just me. I just run the whole thing. And then they were always, like, know what your crazy like. You can't do that. And then it kind of just went away with, you know, I was like, Well, do forensic pathology, I guess. And that's like Bond, I guess. You know, I didn't really know. And now coming back, we were just my husband. I were just talking about this because he helps me with the business. And we just always talked about the business, like 24 7 on your life way always reflect, like, constantly reflecting and changing and stuff. And he he and I were saying, you know, in hindsight now, I should have just done this from the beginning,
    spk_0
    right? Yeah. And that's you know, it's funny that you say that because it was I was three years out when I started my business, and it was a huge decision then. But so part of me wishes I'd started earlier. Yeah, part of me wishes, man. Did I even make the right decision to doing it? But I think that's just any anything. Yeah. Isn't always second guess every decision they make right. Um, but that's interesting. Yeah, it's interesting that you always kind of had that. That interest in the micro.
    spk_1
    Yeah, Well, because you know my my parents, my mom actually came to the U S. During the nursing shortage. So she was a nurse, and then she didn't end up like an end. And my dad, you know, like they're basically became business owners. So I'd saw business as I was growing up all time. They had a little kind of convenience store instead of, ah, mall, you know, and and so purchasing and deposits And, um, just running just running the day to day, every day. They're working every day, every day. And at the time, it was like, whatever. Like Mom. Dad, they're just busy. Um, now it's like, oh, actually taught me something. You know, I I saw all that, and it was like they can do it. I can do it. So
    spk_0
    very cool. Yeah. So, other than a micro ideal medical practice, how would you describe your practice? So when I look on your website, you see the word functional medicine, but I don't think a lot of people know what that is. Is that how you would describe most of your practice or are kind of tell us the difference between what you do in function medicine or how you incorporate
    spk_1
    right? Yes. So So first off. Thanks for functional medicine is kind of functional. Medicine is kinda knew or, uh, terminology that's out there, Right? Um and I don't know how much people in this area know about function medicine, but it it really started it off from from the naturopath IQ world Um, the naturopath IQ doctor or Indy. They usually look at physiology function and and the root cause that's kind of the biggest term is like root costs. Why are you having this or where this coming from? And so that philosophy, I think, holds two Dios or osteopathic physicians as well kind of that body, the body that one of the first tenants of osteopathic medicine is the body has, ah, way to heal itself, you know, And it has a way of finding. Homestay says sometimes you need a manipulative medicine to help you. Sometimes you need diet. Sometimes you need X rays. Sometimes you need medications. And so but you have to look at the whole person in the whole body individually, though. And so I think that the rial, the really, um, spirit of functional medicine is looking at people individually that, you know, this one person coming in with anxiety isn't going to be Oh, the same as the next person that's coming in with anxiety. I've got, you know, a very, very heavyset patient that has anxiety and another one that's very, very skinny. You know, less than £100 with anxiety. I can't treat them the same way but Western medicine or, you know, to Western medicine. You come in through the door, you have a five minute visit with a regular Western doctor. It's and it's not just Western, it's it's It's happening on my side of the world to Interpol as well, because it's all Western medicine. Now everyone's treated with the same solution. Prescription. See you later. You know, seeming into two,
    spk_0
    it becomes a protocol. It becomes an actual individualized right. And I see the same thing in physical therapy. Yeah, you know, if you've had X y z surgery, this is what you do the 1st 6 weeks. Yes, well, well, how can you possibly treat the 24 year old with great strength? And that used to be a marathon runner? Yeah, the same way is the 48 year old that's £150 overweight hasn't exercised in 10 years, right? Right. But that's what the article says. That's what the article said. And that's frustrating. It is. And I don't even like the word protocol. I wish they'd call it guidelines because it needs to be. This is what we should do in an ideal situation,
    spk_1
    ideally, but then use your brain right. And you, sometimes lacking, is sometimes it is. And because, you know, because people in health care really showing out there really strung out there, struggling to just see to see the patients to do this, do that schedule. And that quality is you know, my husband. I talked about it as a restaurant, you know, like I don't know your name. Your name, Name? Name. I, like really have fancy Chef. I don't know,
    spk_0
    Fancy Chef. I don't know Bobby Flay. Is that a guy? I have heard that if
    spk_1
    he has If he has if he is running
    spk_0
    a moral, Okay, it is but
    spk_1
    emerald. Look, ask him himself. I have no ties, Demory. But But if he if you wanted to come to his restaurant, just he cooking himself, right? And his it's his food. And he has, like, maybe one sou chef somewhere somewhere hanging out. How many people can he, you know, feed right? Mean hunting? Hundreds, Not not thousands. So? So that's not transfer also. That's why it should be individual individuals, like, you know, I doing individualized care. And it just it should be just It should just spread like that rather than, you know, if he is making these lasagnas that are frozen and you just put him on a plate and then you beat him up and then you give it to something that's not the same, right? So you can't You can't medicine you medicine. Really? You can't, um, replicate like that. It has to be very, very small.
    spk_0
    Everybody's different, everybody's different. And it's I think that's hard to explain. Two people who assume that every practitioners, right, right? Yeah. They think that physical therapy is physical there, right? You know, a primary care physician is a primary care physician. Yes, obviously not true if you put any thought into it, right? But I think that's kind of what we've been taught, Unfortunately, so, yeah, it is frustrating. Yeah, so, yeah, that's that's the function. Yeah,
    spk_1
    that's a functional medicine inside of it. I think it's like its root cause, and it's, um, kind of individualized care. And so, you know, I I do that. But then I also do osteopathic medicine. I do manipulative medicine. I also do I because I'm from Nepal. I I I say dabble in Iraq, the medicine, too. So I really it's really just ultimately, you know, I've come to its personalized primary care. Basically, that's what I call. I mean there's no, like big trademark or whatever underneath, but that's that's kind of what I practice. If you know, I get the guy that just has the diabetes and he's like, No, just I don't just give me the medication. I don't want to mess with this like Okay, well, you know, I'll talk to him about it and say, Hey, you really should have healthy choices and hear the things and this and that and like how you should avoid sugar and stuff. But I can tell when somebody's like you got to meet people where they're at and so okay for him. Maybe here, take these medications like this and stuff. And then there's the other person, that super extreme. It's like I don't want any medications whatsoever. I want ever. And there, like rip roaring pneumonia like you could potentially die like you need medication. So there's that extreme to So that's why it's like I try to educate, you know,
    spk_0
    absolutely. And I think I think that's the biggest part of the individualized treatment. Brain is truly meeting people where they are right, not forcing your way into them and exam, not the best fit.
    spk_1
    Yeah, riff. ERM yeah,
    spk_0
    and that's I mean, I've got plenty of practitioners that I refer people to. Yeah, because that's not my speciality, right? You got a pelvic floor physical therapist in town. That is a great connection for me because I
    spk_1
    don't do
    spk_0
    that. Yeah, and so that's I think that's what it really boils down to. Is being able to meet people where they are. Yeah, and truly individualized. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So yeah, So we were kind of talking about some concerns with the typical health care model, right? Talked about kind of the cookie cutter approach. Not not ideal for most people. Right? Kind of touch on some other concerns that you have with the typical medical model.
    spk_1
    So you know a lot of this wording I got from Dr Dr Weibo with her ideal medical claire care. And she she turned it really well when she said, um, assembly line medicine. So you're just hurdled through just like cattle. And you're just, you know, Zannex. Okay. Next, uh, Z Pak. Okay, next. And and so that really that really, You know, it's it's unfortunate, because what I've seen in the past year that I've been practicing is that it turns people away when they actually need something. It turns them off of, of really listening to their bodies. Um, I saw gentleman that had fourth stage four colon cancer. I don't know why he had stage four colon cancer. He could have been caught earlier and had that resected. But there was no education. He was, you know, assembly line medicine. All right, you have this. All right? We need to do this when he just he was like, I he you know, I ended up talking to him, put him in a hospice. He's passed away now, you know, but it But he got turned off from from all of this stuff. And so that's what's unfortunate is that really sick? People get turned off and they shut it like real medicinally. They shut it away, and then they go to other things that really won't help them. They'll waste their money on all this other stuff.
    spk_0
    And that's and that's the other side of The unfortunate thing is, there are people better quote preying on the people that have yes, flunked out of the typical medical model. Yeah, and that's obviously not good, either. Yeah, and so there's that balance of right. Can we let the Eastern Medicine meet the Western Medicine? Yes. Provide a high quality of care, right? Without having these outliers of extreme not good care.
    spk_1
    Not good. So, you know, an ironic medicine I read on. I read the medicine and I obey the medicines. You know, in the book that I have in the intro chapter, it says, you know Ah, Western medicine is good for emergencies. You know, it's good for acute care. It is good for when you have a pneumonia, you needed antibiotic. When you have, you know, your arm cut, you need it immediately to get suited. And all this other stuff. Um, it's not good for chronic care. It's because with chronic care, you have to get behind the patient's environment that you have to talk to their about their diet. You have to talk about their works status. You have to talk about their relationship, their emotions there. Where are they spiritually, If they, you know, if they want to talk about, You know, I mean, like, there's that's a huge kind of an hours long hour long, plus more multiple visits, conversations that you have to have, um, and the other aspect of it that I was gonna tell you about assembly line medicine. What the kind of ills of that is the practitioner. It hurts the practitioner and, um, and that's why suicide is a really high rate for physicians. I mean, for the western world, Um, I think I forget how it's worded, but, like for, um, terminal degrees, physicians are number one on the list for, um, so psyched. So it's hurting both the patient and the practitioner.
    spk_0
    That doesn't understand that because I've worked in the typical model, right? You know, I'm throwing up my hand quote, but, you know, my every day I was frustrated about something. Yeah, every day I was frustrated about something, whether it was the number of patients that I was seeing that day, too many patients or, uh, dealing with insurance companies. There's always something that's a stressor. Yeah, and even if you have a good day, it was just okay. It wasn't a great day. Yeah. Yeah. And that's what's so frustrating because you wanna have a good day at work? Yeah, exactly. And obviously you want to be able to provide a higher quality of care. And if you're happy, yeah, you're gonna be able to do that
    spk_1
    and really enjoy that. That that patient clinician, you know, uh, interchange, like, really enjoy it. Rather have all these things like, Oh, my God, that I didn't get paid for that. And I didn't You know, they have this and I didn't have that, you know? And and I was late and everyone's mad at me. after that, you know? I mean, like, it's, um So So that's another thing that Pamela why bolt like she talked about is that that it's hurting. It's hurting the healer. So how If you are hurt as a healer, how can you heal others? Right, So it's and and and now looking at it, you know, and and heard the whole deal was like, you did it for three years. Her whole deal was like, Look like I did this for, like, 10 years. My program is here so that people don't make the same mistake. And I was like, Okay, I'm I'm doing it. I'm just going to do it
    spk_0
    right. And you mentioned that. And I think one of my biggest frustrations as a patient going to a primary care physician is there looking at the computer, you get a five minute appointment. It might have made eye contact twice, right? Yeah, I'm sure that's not everybody, but it happens. Yeah, because I've heard that before. Yes, and it's more than just me, right? Yeah. One of my rules that I put on myself with seeing clients is I don't type notes while they're here, right? Yeah, I'll do that later, right? Cause I'm here for the hour, right? And that's probably how you do. Things I do mind is on a few notes or handwritten mind missing
    spk_1
    ball, hand written old school. I have, ah, sheet that I just went out and I make myself have that eye contact and have. There's something. I think there's something forgiving when you actually have a clipboard and a pen and you're sitting right next to somebody and like looking at them and ready. No, still feel kind of Oh, yes, she's taking notes. I get that, you know, it's and it's their name on the chart and everything. But on a computer, it's so distant, and it just becomes like, What are they doing? Are they even like on the computer while what do they even do? And the other thing about the M R. Is it just There's a lot of check boxes. Um, that's why I don't actually have a M r. There's just check boxes, Altana check boxes and and you know, my forms have checked boxes in them, but I'm actually looking at them and, you know, seeing there there
    spk_0
    were these of sweat click
    spk_1
    easiness. Yeah. Yeah. So a lot of patients, when they come see me, they'll say, Like, you know, they didn't care. My My primary. Yeah, they don't care. They just sit there and just Well, uh, my psychiatry, huh? Only just Oh, and like, click. And then I'm gone. And then I get my scripts. And, like, I didn't even want thes. I told him I didn't want you.
    spk_0
    Yeah, and that's, you know, again, I'm not trying to bash the practitioners now, And you aren't either now, but I think the system is set up for failure. And, yeah, I know you've broken away from the system I have broken away from right the system to try to provide a different style, right? Not necessarily. Always better for every single thing. But for the people I see it is, it is. You see? Yes is yes. Oh, you know, it's a hard answer. Is there? Is there a perfect way for medical care? I don't I don't know that there's a perfect answer, but what we're doing is not ideal. Yeah, yeah. Yes, exactly. Big topic there. Sorry. Yeah, I'm trust kind of I don't know. That's totally fine of your comments earlier that you had been an educator, huh? Maybe ty that, too. How you communicate with your patients? Yes, I think there's a lot of confusion. Of what? What is really going on with me with
    spk_1
    somebody's help, Right? So Dr is Del Sur in French? I don't know if I'm saying Larry, but it means teacher. So Doctor doctor really means teacher. And it's that level of education that we've received And we were lucky enough to receive that we've, you know, amassed so much information and it's our duty. Um, it's it's in us to actually teach somebody else about their health, right? And if that edged lit level of education isn't there, I always tell people, um, find something else that'll explain it to you. We Now, now we have so much information online that I have patients that you know are sometimes like cooling diagnosis, diagnoses and freaking themselves out. And yeah, there's like, the rare times that they really know what they're doing, And they kind of like, Hey, look like that whom whomever, didn't listen to me. So I just looked at it and all that kind of stuff, but You know, the educator aspect from teaching and being in front of open to students is that, you know, my for my practice. Patients can call me. They can text me. My It's my number. Um, they can email me and I always have a plan written out for them. Um, and with, you know, this is what's going on with you. These are your numbers, you know, hemoglobin, a one C. It's elevate. You know, I go through the list like, what does that mean? What is a human glow? Me, unc even meet and, like, really explaining it. And I've had a patient that's, you know, as diabetes and was seen somebody for years and years and years, and she's like, I never knew any of this stuff. Thank you for telling me that what I eat the night before is affecting my pain, you know, and kind of going through that and explaining these little nuances. Um,
    spk_0
    and that's one of those diseases that if you don't explain it, they're never gonna get
    spk_1
    it. Never gonna
    spk_0
    handle. Yeah, that's that's frustrating from right. My perspective, right. How how did that go so long? Exactly? Before it was explained well,
    spk_1
    right? Yeah. And and just yet, that kind of simple, just a simple, really basics that Because it's because what we do, what we do is really technically have all this knowledge, right? And it's so technical, and we kind of like, gloss it over like, Oh, but you know, you have that that that aspect of Dr Means teacher, you have to I feel like I try to take ownership of that and make sure, um, in the visit itself, right. So, um, even and even an intake whenever we're like getting people's history, I'll try to correct them like Hey, hey, no, no, that's not whatever. Like that's, you know, it'll be some something weird, like they think they have, like, you know, hypertension. And second, I don't know, like, maybe were you anxious and, you know, you know, like it kind of kind of dispel some myths. For example, I don't give the best example examples, but and then the other, as
    spk_0
    the biggest thing is that you're just not assuming now, you know, you're not assuming that they know this thing this year. No, you're gonna confirm confirming, clarify exactly. And what's going on and what they're telling you actually makes sense,
    spk_1
    right? And so, yeah, And then in the in the plan that I kind of type up for people. Um, of course there's huge, Kind of That's a that's a That's my pet peeve. Whenever I ever saw a doctor was that I talked to him and then I got like, Now what? I don't have anything. Like what? What did I talk about? I don't remember. And so I usually give people a letter and with a list of these other things we talked about and this is the labs what you need and you're the supplements that you should take And this is what you should work on your diet, and then at least if they don't ever, ever see me ever come back. At least I have that peace of mind say, Hey, I made sure they understood all that stuff. The other aspect of the educator thing is I like to give talks around the area, and so I've done. I've done a few talks that are completely free, Um, as as kind of more outreach for other people that maybe can't come see me or afford it or whatever. Um,
    spk_0
    so that I make application exactly right and still be able to help people. Even if they're not a client of yours. Exactly. Sure. Yeah. Mixing.
    spk_1
    And then and then the block block post. I'll have blood posts and stuff like that to you. Yeah.
    spk_0
    Is there something in particular there in terms of a condition or a disease that you're passionate about in terms of the education piece? I know you mentioned diabetes. You mentioned anxiety. Yeah. You know, is that Is that something that you enjoy? Those client,
    spk_1
    Um, is
    spk_0
    there something specific? That's like, this is my
    spk_1
    thing. I don't really my thing. I don't really I people ask me this. Like, what? Do do you like? What? He liked us, You know, like like to see and stuff. And it's like I just like talking to people that just like talking to me. Good people. Yeah, it's really well, yeah, yeah. I don't have a specific disease like drives me crazy or anything. It's like I'm not that that Yeah, I don't I don't have anything like that. I feel like what I usually generally feed off of energy of is a patient that is self motivated and educated but wanting to get more information and wanting wanting to get their, you know, wanting to wanting to be educated, wanting more. Um,
    spk_0
    And I think that's so much more common in our style of business. Yeah. You know, they're not expecting the cookie cutter because yeah, they've They've seen that. They start you out for a reason. They stopped me. Exactly. So they're already more motivated Person? Yeah. Walking in the door. Yeah. So if I asked them to do a B and C for homework, they're probably gonna do it because they had a failure at some point. That's why they're seeing me exact most of the time, most of the time. And so that that's yes. It makes it easier on me because they're already motivated. They are that good person that wants good information and good activity and whatever it is. So there's a bit of that assistance with the balance of providing good care and finding good people, right? Yeah, yeah, yeah. One of the things that we had talked about before we were started recording here was work, life balance. Yeah, and obviously that's a part of the happiness of any practitioner or of any person, but kind of go into how you incorporate that too yourself?
    spk_1
    Yeah. And that kind of goes, you know, back into that, that assembly line medicine. Why I'm out of that big system is that, you know, first of all, being my my own boss, I can make my own hours. I can schedule it. Um, I can say, you know what? I just don't want to work on next Thursday. Let me just can't. You know, I'm just gonna like or or in December, I'm just gonna take off. I've taken off two weeks in December. I'm just like it's not. Their appointments are just not there. Um, so that's really important. And then and then the little things being able to sleep is really important. Being able to go to the bathroom when you want to is really important, because in a in a regular shift in a hospital or robbery, you don't have time. You don't have time or, like go to the bathroom, drink water, um, so that you know, it's the It's the really the little things that I really appreciate and that I want to to kind of instill in my daughter, and she's six and 1/2. And so in our family, we always eat good food, you know, you know, drink water, get good rest, relax. You know, and and it really comes back to practicing what I preach when I'm talking to somebody about their diet or whatever it's like, I'm not just like running into wherever fast food and just stuffing my face. It's like, Well, I'm gonna go home, We're gonna cook, and we're gonna actually think about this meal and have a good place, you know, like
    spk_0
    then you can speak from a place of experience, rather just yes, already.
    spk_1
    Yeah, exactly. So, yeah, that's kind of I think that's that work life balance and really finding that balance of, of and get practice. And then gardening is another aspect of it, and and gardening goes in with, like learning about plants and learning about potato goals that are that can treat people. And and, you know, there's there's so many things that we do that I feel like tie into, um, you know, we go for a walk. Every morning, we drop our daughter off to school and then we go to the park, we do a few laps and walk and talk about our day. And then and then I go to work. And so it has to be there so that I could actually be a good of sound mind.
    spk_0
    Toe. You're more engaged, yet more engaged. You're in a good mental space, right? And physical space to work well with people. It's awesome. You know, It reminds me my mom was a pharmacist. Oh, and so she would work a 10 hour, 11 hour day from 8 a.m. Six p. M. No lunch break, right? No bathroom break.
    spk_1
    My husband's a pharmacist, so and he hates it. He he's He's another person that does not like the traditional forms it, and that's why he's working with me.
    spk_0
    So, you know, I've heard of all of these negatives of Yeah, I didn't get to use bathroom day. How How can you do that? Like I just can't fathom it. But if you're the only pharmacy is you're the only person there even take Yeah, five minutes. No. Yeah. So I, uh I can understand that being able to set your own hours, I did the same thing? Yes. Set your own schedule where you can not manipulated but craft it to fit your lifestyle. Exactly. It makes a big deal. Yeah, and so you know, I'm a morning person. I see people at 5 30 in the morning here. If they want to come in early, that's fine. You have no problem with that. They're getting, you know, their therapy out of the way. They don't have to take time off of work. They can get it done before they go to work. Not missing out on family time in the evening, whatever it might be, that's a big deal to a lot of people. And it fits my if it's your life. Solitude. Yeah, it's my lifestyle. So, you know, they're probably some people that air on awesome fit for that. Yeah, but they don't even know that it is that it that it's out there? Yeah. Yeah, but there's there's gonna be a better fit for some people than others. You've crafted a business that fits your lifestyle. Exactly. If other people fit it, Yes, you're both gonna be Oh, yeah, exactly. So perusing your website?
    spk_1
    Yeah. Oh, no. What? Do what do you find you some of my
    spk_0
    friends and I pose No, no, no type. I found some poetry and some art. You and your husband. So right, right. Right, I guess. How does that creativity There's a creative Yeah. Yeah. How does that creativity fit into the style of practice that you have?
    spk_1
    Well, Oh, that's a really good question. And I think you're gonna ask it like that. Wow. So style and practice. Well, you know, my husband, I we say that we're we're artists Before we were, you know, he's learned, you know, stuffy learned doctors. Yeah, and and we're just kind of We met when we were 16. So we're just like these wild and crazy kids. Not really.
    spk_0
    Not really. You met your husband? He doesn't seem too wild and crazy and needed to use. So
    spk_1
    no, no, no. Now what? We always say that, like, we were just nothing's, you know, when we met, you know, we didn't. Yeah. Anyways, so he he has his art, and I have I've always written since, you know, we've met each other. That's what we were. He was the artists, and I was the writer, and we tried to you know, that's that work life balance. Kind of getting back to that. It's that we've we've we've kind of poke each other like, hey, you need to go do some. Where are I was tell him And he's like, Yeah, you go write more and yeah, and the way you how did you pose the question? How does that
    spk_0
    affect the creativity? You have art presses? Yeah,
    spk_1
    versus medicine and medicine. It's thought that medicine is so like you were saying protocol driven right now, but you know, there is that art of medicine that everyone talks about. Well, I mean, I feel like people talk about when I was in med school. That is just not there anymore. That that that kind of, you know, just there's this thing that that, like your your brain, kind of lights up and you can kind of see things a little bit differently. And, yeah, there is that creativity in medicine that I have in the art of medicine and just being able to talk to somebody and being able to kind of, um, do a manipulative treatment. It's like, Well, this isn't by the book, but, you know, I can feel this, but yeah, I didn't think you were gonna put it like that. Yeah, hopefully I answer that. Okay,
    spk_0
    No. So the one that the one that got my attention? Yeah. Home That got my attention. Dear old doctors, dear Newt. Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. It was the 1st 1 I picked. Yeah, just kind of see what we look like. And it touches on, you know, the old school, right? Versus the new school. Exactly. And how there might have been flaws in both. But there's also benefits to both. Yeah, and so it may not just be east versus West. Sometimes there's that old versus new, right, Sometimes they overlap. Of course. Yeah. Um, that was kind of interesting. Yeah. I knew that we had similar practice time. Yes. Yeah, and so I kind of was drawn to that.
    spk_1
    Oh, I see. I see. That's where the other the other aspect of it is almost like therapy for me. Um, the writing and kind of, you know, because, you know, we see a lot of grief and health care. There's a lot of people dying and people really sick. And, you know, there's there's a lot of that. And so it's thes people that kind of stick in my mind that just it's almost like a PTSD. Like they just kind of come up in my head like in the middle of the night sometimes. And so that's kind of therapy for me to write about them. Of course, I don't. You know, there's hip in all I don't like. I don't like blatantly say, Oh, this is this But it's a way of kind of kind of putting something concrete on these this emotion that I that I have, um what ice Meet somebody? Because there is that connection, that emotion. That's that that doesn't go away. You have to deal with it somehow. That's how I guess I deal with it.
    spk_0
    Very good. Yeah. Yeah, it's awesome. Yeah, you know, it's funny. I was looking over my shoulder when you were talking about the creativity. My license is from the board of Healing Arts. Right? There is
    spk_1
    a You know what I'm saying? Yeah.
    spk_0
    And I think about how I treat. And yes, there is science behind what I'm doing, right? Every single time. Yeah, but you have to be creative to an extent to be able to provide quality care, especially for what I'm doing right. If someone has a very specific issue and they've got pain with a certain position, say it's overhead lifting that that requires a very specific manual treatment requires a very specific exercise, exercising whatever, whatever it might be. Yeah, yeah, And each person's gonna be different. So if I've only given, I don't If I only know 20 shoulder exercises and none of those work for this person, what am I gonna do? Yeah, that's not gonna go well. You have to be creative enough to be ableto invent the right fit for each person aged person. That's player of the individualized care it is. But there has to be a level of creativity and especially what we do it. Yeah, there especially.
    spk_1
    Yeah, I think especially in primary care, because primary care, you're you're dealing with so many different things.
    spk_0
    Such a such a lie. There's no specialty. There isn't something specific usually,
    spk_1
    Yeah, and it's like, you know, you you kind of have to like, Oh, this person's like this. This person is the type that will not want to take anything that I give them So how do I pose it? You know, like so you can't think it's It's kind of like a puzzle piece. And And you have to you have to think outside the box on those types of people.
    spk_0
    So awesome. Yeah. So the, uh I guess the green sheep question here. Uh, green. Yeah. Madame Medical marijuana. I got, um this is Missouri. Yeah, right. So? So it's legal as of January 1st, is that correct?
    spk_1
    So people can get their cards already? They've okay. June is when it
    spk_0
    started. So I'm I don't know much, So kind
    spk_1
    of you
    spk_0
    just give the two minute rundown on what? What's illegal, What's not. And then why you've decided to be a practitioner.
    spk_1
    Okay, so, um, cannabis is now, um, it's still federally illegal. Still, schedule one. But it is a legal in the state of Missouri in the sense that the medical program is here for patients that have a name, medical conditions and the medical conditions were listed on the State Department, Health and Senior Service's Web site. Um, and if you qualify, you would need to come see a physician for it has to be a nem di or dio a physician for certification. So, you know, sometimes that requires diagnosis. And, um, sometimes you already have a diagnosis, and you just kind of like, sure, your paper and stuff. You can get that. So you get a certification from the physician, and then you can go to the Department of Health and Senior Service's Web site, end electronically, fill out all the forms to get the medical marijuana card so that you can potentially get up. You know, get cannabis in January. So eventually, Yeah, I say in in January, I say potentially in January because I don't know exactly when things are opening. Yeah, that's how I see potential in January, um, the licenses were going to be for dispensaries gonna be released in January. I don't know when storefronts will actually come up and open. So I, the people that I've seen since June, I educate a lot of patients on home cultivation. They don't know that that's on off. That's something that's offered from the state so you can actually get your car your cam's card. In addition, you can pay, so that's $25 for the card, you can pay $100 to tell the state that yet you're gonna be cultivating who are growing cannabis for your disease condition,
    spk_0
    then obviously, that would end up being less expensive. Long term? Yes. Obviously. Isn't front investment? Yes, for whatever the equipment might be. Yes, yes, exactly. Experts. Oh, right,
    spk_1
    right, right. Yeah, there is, like, a little bit of up front crossed. Um and so, Yeah, that's kind of the rundown on cannabis. So why cannabis? Why did I choose to do it? Well, you know, and I read that medicine we've been using cannabis for 9000 years. Um, cannabis has been in, um, Nepal, India, China. It's been in Chinese medicine as well. Um, cannabis was never supposed to be on illicit substance. And now everyone in the west thinks, Oh, cannabis is going to treat everything in diabetic medicine. Cannabis was never used by itself. It was always used in conjunction with other botanicals and other treatment modalities. So that's really I mean, you know my heritage. Um, when I was going to school in in Kathmandu, walking on my bus stop, I'd see cannabis as tall as I am like just walking in the field.
    spk_0
    It's just a normal thing. It's just
    spk_1
    not a big deal. It became illegal because of us pressure. Um And so now the physicians or the boy days in Iraq, the medicine in India and Nepal can't actually use cannabis for treating. So yeah, So, you know, there was my grandfather down the street from like, just in that same burrow that he lives. There was a king of the shop and they would sell Yeah, they would sell Now, you know, in huge out other everybody in the neighborhood go there for for the for the bright day or the physicians for cannabis. And now it's like this, like, you know, the West. It's like it's coming legal, which I'm glad, sure, but I always try to educate in that eastern sense
    spk_0
    of conjunction. Yes, that's what I was looking for because I have seen so many people become reliant on Yes, certain things right. You come become reliant on the narcotics, you could become reliant on the CBD, right? And now there's just another thing to become reliant on. Unfortunately, and that's really frustrating from my perspective. Because if you're hurting, you're not treating the cause. Exactly. You're exactly a symptom. Yes. So, just like you were talking about at the very beginning, I have to get to that root cause, right? You're not treating it. It doesn't matter what you you know medicating. Yeah, it's just treating the symptom, right? So exactly the same. I know.
    spk_1
    I tell patients, you know, that a majority of people that I have seen is for anxiety. And I always tell him, Hey, look, no amount of cannabis is gonna take your anxiety away. You, you know, And if you know that there's no way you need to figure all this other stuff out and it's it's not. It's not a pen, ISI, you can't. It's not for everything. You have to have other modalities. Another, you know. But let's I usually say botanicals or supplements. You know, other things, diet, dietary changes that you have to use in conjunction. Otherwise, you're just gonna be using and use it and use it and using it. And then you're swapping like you said opiates for canvas. Now it's just you. Instead of going to get your prescription filled at the pharmacy, you're just going to the dispensary, and that's why I try to tell people to cultivate.
    spk_0
    Make sense? Yeah. Where? It's just an additive. He was doing all the right things. Whether it's the exercise, ask again from my perspective, the exercise or the movement. Any movement? Yeah.
    spk_1
    And there is therapy in gardening. So actually growing your medicine?
    spk_0
    Sure. There is a head named thought about it that way. Love it. Yeah, that's excellent. I think that was all the questions I got for you. Thank you. You do have an offer.
    spk_1
    Oh, yes, yes, yes, yes.
    spk_0
    Let's let's talk about the offer.
    spk_1
    Yes. Oh, for December. Um, So I was at a conference and I met a lady that's running for think, uh, Congress U S Congress or something. Ah, Adelle. Wisdom is her name. I remembered it. So she I remember connecting with her, and I was talking with her, and she was like, Yeah, you know, your doctor that does the camps car. That's great and all, but oh, I wish I could get one. I'm too poor. I mean, the cameras cards aren't for people like me. I don't have any money. I was like, Wow, this is that really held in my mind. I was like, you know, cause they're currently either. They're kind of pricey, and it's just kind of a race, too, you know what I mean? I don't mean to bash, but there's, like, pot docks or, you know, doctors Doc in a boxes that you just go in and get the diagnosis and stuff, and I do a lot more than I. Obviously, we discussed it, so I like, you know, for people that are that I've already met that have their campus card for other family members. If they know of somebody that needs a little bit of assistance, it's kind of that I'm doing a special in December for, um, a $50 that's really like one of the cheapest in Missouri. Ah, $50 certification and it's strictly for certification. It's not for diagnosis. Um, I There are a lot of pot docks that don't do diagnosis. They only do certifications and actually do diagnosis because I'm primary care physician, so I do diagnosis as well. But that's different. That's a whole other
    spk_0
    doesn't rates for you. That's to see you. That's not just me, but for come in with records. Yeah, they were apparently a patient of yours exactly.
    spk_1
    Yes. Yeah. And there are a lot of people that are like, Oh, yeah, you're doing this now. Great. You know, because they're holding out. And December is a good time because, you know, that's the whole idea. January. Hopefully, dispensaries will open, and people will find a little relief that way. So it's $50 for the certification. It's a 15 minute visit with me, which is, you know, really quick visit. I don't get to talk to them very long. Um, but but it's, you know, if people have their, you know, like health records, they have their X rays, their memory reports or prescription medication. Are lists from the pharmacy or something. If they already have their records and hand that, that's that's that would be for them.
    spk_0
    Perfect. Yeah. So, $50 certification for the medical marijuana, huh? December? Yep. It just the whole month of December. Yeah,
    spk_1
    and yeah. And like I said, it's not like I'm not opening every day. I'm just work Tuesday, Thursday, So limited, but yeah, I have a block post link I can share with you. If you want to
    spk_0
    show that we can be sure that, um anything else that you want to share
    spk_1
    now, this has been super fun. We can
    spk_0
    absolutely We'll check in in a few months. Thank you so much for being here, Dr Strong. I appreciate you coming on the show. And this has been ston active.
    spk_1
    Thank you for
    spk_0
    listening to the S t. L. Active podcast from ST Louis dot com If you enjoy the show, please spread the word. Thanks again and see you next time.

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